z
zeldathemes
various clothes i don't want to forget about either for art reference or character building.
i know it's a mess and nothing works
i'm sorry

David Bowie, Justin Bieber, Rihanna Holy Trinity, Kilian Kerner S/S 2015

David Bowie, Justin Bieber, Rihanna Holy Trinity, Kilian Kerner S/S 2015

  #q  

facina-oris:

myth fashion

poseidon ;

  #q  

f a s h i o n  c o m e s  t o  l i f e || elie saab f/w ‘14-15 [I/V]

  #q  
mymilkweed:

SDCC is coming up and I’m going which means I have superheroes on the brain.

mymilkweed:

SDCC is coming up and I’m going which means I have superheroes on the brain.

  #yessssssss    #wonder woman    #q  

tok-kyo:

タイプライター MILKチェックイージーパンツ

15,120円

  #q  
geekygothgirl:

newwavefeminism:

theultraintrovert:

terhasshouts:

wifigirl2080:

be-blackstar:

girlannachronism:

Thom Browne fall 2014 rtw backstage

THIS IS NOT THOM BROWNE’S, THIS IS NOT “LORDE-INSPIRED” 
East African women (and probably other women from that region of the world) have BEEN dying their fingertips 





Reblogging for knowledge drop

Yup, my momma been doin this.

I know Sooooo many black and brown girls that use to get mocked for this (Some African, indo-pak) and now its acceptable because its “fashion”

There’s something that really, really sickens me about the way fashion treats the traditions stolen from black/brown regions.For example:

But let’s not forget the first time dip dyed fingers were seen on the runway. Sorry Thom, but Mara Hoffman beat you to it. For her Fall 2011 show, the “Middle Eastern desert woman” look was complete with ink-stained fingers. Makeup artist Lottie for Make Up For Ever used body paint to achieve the look.

Literally, it’s been a fashion trend rooted in taking real present day women and turning them into exotic, taboo fictionalized caricatures. It’s not even “oh we stole this look and pretending it’s brand new” it’s "This is fashion because we’re acknowledging that we don’t consider these women as *real* and we want to *dirty* ourselves by playing dress up as them" I continue to get “look how weird and daring my pristine white model hands look with this horrifying risky taboo ink on my finger tips” from these fashion websites as they describe this “look.”
I’m sorry, women in Africa and South Asia are constantly used as this sick juxtaposition to pristine white dainty womanhood. Want to be daring and fashionable? Associate yourselves with one of these grimy cultures (that no one even understand on the most shallow of levels) and it’s suddenly so horrifying it’s avant garde.
This really, and truly creeps me out deep down to see the real women from various, rich cultures placed in such a box. Only to be opened when a white super model wants to be interpreted as “daring”.

Can we just stop with this, please? The reasons have been excellently outlined above. 

geekygothgirl:

newwavefeminism:

theultraintrovert:

terhasshouts:

wifigirl2080:

be-blackstar:

girlannachronism:

Thom Browne fall 2014 rtw backstage

THIS IS NOT THOM BROWNE’S, THIS IS NOT “LORDE-INSPIRED” 

East African women (and probably other women from that region of the world) have BEEN dying their fingertips 

Reblogging for knowledge drop

Yup, my momma been doin this.

I know Sooooo many black and brown girls that use to get mocked for this (Some African, indo-pak) and now its acceptable because its “fashion”

There’s something that really, really sickens me about the way fashion treats the traditions stolen from black/brown regions.For example:

But let’s not forget the first time dip dyed fingers were seen on the runway. Sorry Thom, but Mara Hoffman beat you to it. For her Fall 2011 show, the “Middle Eastern desert woman” look was complete with ink-stained fingers. Makeup artist Lottie for Make Up For Ever used body paint to achieve the look.

Literally, it’s been a fashion trend rooted in taking real present day women and turning them into exotic, taboo fictionalized caricatures. It’s not even “oh we stole this look and pretending it’s brand new” it’s "This is fashion because we’re acknowledging that we don’t consider these women as *real* and we want to *dirty* ourselves by playing dress up as them" I continue to get “look how weird and daring my pristine white model hands look with this horrifying risky taboo ink on my finger tips” from these fashion websites as they describe this “look.”

I’m sorry, women in Africa and South Asia are constantly used as this sick juxtaposition to pristine white dainty womanhood. Want to be daring and fashionable? Associate yourselves with one of these grimy cultures (that no one even understand on the most shallow of levels) and it’s suddenly so horrifying it’s avant garde.

This really, and truly creeps me out deep down to see the real women from various, rich cultures placed in such a box. Only to be opened when a white super model wants to be interpreted as “daring”.

Can we just stop with this, please? The reasons have been excellently outlined above. 

  #q  
tastier:

(18+)

tastier:

(18+)

  #q  

photos by Alexander Richter

  #q  
m-i-s-o:

Miso : Home-Made Tattoos : 40 stars for 40 years, a shield around the body. For Beci, traded for a rug from her new > project. Melbourne, 2014

m-i-s-o:

Miso : Home-Made Tattoos :
40 stars for 40 years, a shield around the body.
For Beci, traded for a rug from her new > project. Melbourne, 2014

  #q  

roca-wear:

Giannina Oteto, T I T A N, by Mo Gaff

  #q  

antisocialonsocialnetworks:

iluvsouthernafrica:

Swaziland/Zimbabwe:

Stunning designs by women of Southern Africa through Mustard Seed Africa’s “Rural to Ramp” showcase.

So inspired.

  #q  
notordinaryfashion:

Ralph & Russo Haute Couture Fall 2014-15

notordinaryfashion:

Ralph & Russo Haute Couture Fall 2014-15

  #q  

Nicolas Andreas Taralis F/W 2013

Nicolas Andreas Taralis F/W 2013

  #q  
eros-turannos:

LOOK. IT’S AN INFOGRAPHIC FOR RUFFS. This coming from the fantastic French blog La costume historique—at least, I think they’re fantastic? I’m mostly looking at the pictures.
There’s also one that matches ruffs with collars, which is great.
Wish they ventured into the 17th century, but. Still. What a time to be alive.

eros-turannos:

LOOK. IT’S AN INFOGRAPHIC FOR RUFFS. This coming from the fantastic French blog La costume historique—at least, I think they’re fantastic? I’m mostly looking at the pictures.

There’s also one that matches ruffs with collars, which is great.

Wish they ventured into the 17th century, but. Still. What a time to be alive.

  #q  

up close and personal↳ giambattista valli spring 2014 couture

up close and personal
↳ giambattista valli spring 2014 couture

  #q